Not the Same Poet, But Always an Artist

Friday, 1st October 2021 to Sunday, 31st October 2021, 11:00 to 18:00
Free entry. Exhibition slots bookable in advance. → Book

image by Vonalina Cake Photography

 

Exhibitions, films and workshops by Hazel Hammond.

Hazel Hammond has been a poet and an artist for over 40 years. In 2018 she had a stroke and now lives with Aphasia, a condition shared by over 350,000 people in the UK and affecting their ability to speak, write and read. 

Learning to use words again is tricky for a poet! This project explores the effects of Aphasia on Hazel’s work as she rediscovers her artistic practice through drawings, film making and other artforms.

Drawing and artistic expression have been vital to her recovery. This work tells Hazel’s story visually and she hopes it will support other people living with Aphasia and their families, raising  awareness of the vital role that arts can play in recovery.

Not the Same Poet, But Always an Artist consists of exhibitions of drawings and photographs at partner venues: Arnolfini and Southmead Hospital, workshops for people living with Aphasia, their families and the medical staff involved in their care, as well as public film screenings and exhibitions.

Southmead Hospital, Bristol: 7 September to 18 December 2021
Usually the hospital is open between 8am and 8pm.  However, visitor numbers are limited by Covid guidelines within the hospital (which may be different to national guidelines) so please check with https://www.nbt.nhs.uk/patients-carers/visitors/visiting-times before setting out.  Please note that ALL visitors must observe hand washing, mask wearing and social distancing rules in order to keep themselves, Southmead staff and patients safe.

Arnolfini, Bristol: 1 to 31 October 2021
Open Tuesday to Sunday, 11am to 6pm each week. Entry is free. 

Not the Same Poet, But Always an Artist film screenings will take place in the Dark Studio at Arnolfini throughout the day during the weekend of Friday 29 to Sunday 31 October. Again, admission is free.

In September a series of short films will be released, check here to see them first from Tuesday 7 September:  https://vimeo.com/showcase/8677345

 

 

About Hazel Hammond:
Hazel Hammond has been a poet and an artist for over 40 years. In 2018 she had a stroke and now lives with Aphasia. Learning to use words again is tricky for a poet! 

Aphasia is a changing condition affecting over 350,000 people in the UK impacting on ability to speak, write and read. 

Not the Same Poet, But Always an Artist explores the effects of Aphasia on Hazel’s work as she rediscovers her artistic practice through drawings, film making and other artforms.

Drawing and artistic expression have been vital to her recovery. This work tells Hazel’s story visually, and she hopes it will support other people living with Stroke and their families, raising awareness of the vital role that arts can play in recovery.

‘I needed to do the drawings as I couldn’t explain what was going on.’ 

Not the Same Poet, But Always an Artist consists of exhibitions of drawings and photographs at Arnolfini and Southmead Hospital, including film showings and workshops for people living with Stroke, their families and the medical staff involved in their care. A series of short films created by Hazel and collaborators Biggerhouse Film will also be available for online viewing.

I would sit down in the morning and draw how I felt. It is very frightening to not have your words, to miss out on conversations and feel disconnected.

It was later in my recovery that I looked back and could see myself learning and growing as the pictures were changing. Seeing sequence in the drawings built my confidence that I would eventually be able read and write again.

About the hats, Hazel says Making the hats was important as I was able to work out how I felt about what had happened to me share this with people. There doesn’t seem to be any provision like this within health services. I encouraged other people who had had strokes to make hats, and they were all so different! They were able to use the hat to talk to their families about the way they were feeling.

The images in this exhibitions don’t have labels because we wanted them to speak to you.

We hope this exhibition brings hope and inspiration to people living with stroke and their families.

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